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Passing Afternoon – 100% Brett Mosaic Pale Ale

Passing Afternoon – 100% Brett Mosaic Pale Ale
Will Dozier
Avg. Reading Time: 3 min

Since I started homebrewing I have been looking for ways to push flavors and try new things with brewing. Lately, I have been really intrigued by the use of brettanomyces as the primary fermenting yeast strain in beer. I have done a few experimental small 1 gallon 100% brett batches and I have been happy but I really wanted to take it to the next level. As soon as my local home brew store, High County Hombrew, got some fresh Mosaic hops I knew it was time. I felt that the mango, lemon, citrus, earthy pine, tropical fruit, herbal and stone fruit notes that the Mosaic hops produced were made to go with a fruitiness of some strains of brettanomyces. Below outlines the recipe and thoughts behind Passing Afternoon – 100% Brett Mosaic Pale Ale.

Passing Afternoon – 100% Brett Mosaic Pale Ale
Starting the brew day.

From there I wanted to select the appropriate strain of brettanomyces that complimented the hops. Through research from Chad Yakobson, owner and brewmaster of Crooked Stave, and tasting many of his 100% brett beers I decided that I would pitch multiple strains of brettanomyces to increase the complexity. I also decided that i would culture some of Chad’s own strains from a bottle of St. Bretta. According to Chad, St. Bretta has 2 different house strains of brettanomyces with in the beer. I pitched the dregs from two bottles in 400ml starter 2 weeks before our brew day. The yeast had great activity and smelled tropically amazing. I also made a start of brettanomyces claussenii to add to the mix. Along with this, fellow brewmaster and fellow porchdrinking writer, Philip Joyce made a starter of brettanomyces trois. We figured we would split the 10 gallon batch and add his starter to five gallons and add the other 2 starters to the other 5 gallons. This would be a 4 different strain brew day.

Passing Afternoon – 100% Brett Mosaic Pale Ale
Vorlauf

The brew day went well and the yeasts were pitched. Now time will tell how these multiple yeast strains will transform this beer. Stay tuned for a tasting of these two versions of the Passing Afternoon – 100% Brett Mosaic Pale Ale.

Passing Afternoon – 100% Brett Mosaic Pale Ale
Getting Ready for the Yeast.

Brewed on 5-4-2013
Tasted on 5-30-2013 
Gravity is down to 1.008. Smells of pineapple  Taste is heavy stone fruits, peaches, pears, nectarines. Has a slight tart finish. Looking to bottle possibly next week.

Passing Afternoon – 100% Brett Mosaic Pale Ale

Recipe Specifications
Batch Size (fermenter): 10.00 gal
Estimated OG: 1.058 SG
Estimated Color: 6.1 SRM
Estimated IBU: 26 IBUs
Brewhouse Efficiency: 68.00%
Est Mash Efficiency: 71.6%
Boil Time: 60 Minutes

Grain:
20 lbs               Pale Malt (2 Row) US (2.0 SRM)                    78.0 %
2.25 lbs            Munich Malt (9.0 SRM)                                   8.8 %
2.25 lbs            White Wheat Malt (3.5 SRM)                          8.8 %
1.0 lbs              Acid Malt (3.0 SRM)                                       3.9 %
.15 lbs             Caramel/Crystal Malt -120L (120.0 SRM)        0.6 %

Hops:
0.50 oz               Mosaic [10.00 %] – First Wort 60.0 min                     9.2 IBUs
1.00 oz               Mosaic [10.00 %] – Boil 30.0 min                              12.9 IBUs
1.00 oz               Mosaic [10.00 %] – Boil 15.0 min                               4.2 IBUs
2.00 oz               Mosaic [10.00 %] – Boil 0.0 min                                 0.0 IBUs

Yeast:
5 Gallons – Propped up dregs from Crooked Stave St. Bretta and White Labs Brettanomyces Claussenii (WLP645)
5 Gallons – White Labs Brettanomyces  Bruxellensis Trios (WLP644)

Mash:
Rest at 152 for 60 mins

Comments

  1. Mike

    Hi – just curious how this turned out after you bottled it? Considering doing a Citra Pale Ale with Brett only. Assume you did not use a secondary and just let it ferment out completely in the primary?

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