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Beers to Get You Through Amazon Prime Day

prime day
Taylor Laabs

Few things are normal this year. The pandemic has even brought the time-honored, shopper-splurging tradition of Black Friday into doubt. One ritual that has remained consistent, and increased in many ways, is online shopping. So, luckily, Amazon Prime Day remains mostly unchanged this year.

Happening October 13-14, Prime Day offers shoppers a bunch of random deals, some truly odd offerings and a select few good values. Still, it’s fun to browse around and see if you can catch a purchase high getting 20% off a voice-enabled tech item you’ll use sparingly. Similarly, browsing your local bottle shop can often be more about the experience than the outcome. So, we pulled together a list of the five typical items you might encounter on Prime Day, alongside their beer comparison. 

The Essential 

The Amazon Essential line of clothing, cookware and everything in between isn’t flashy but it fits the need. While many of these items probably won’t have huge markups on Prime Day, they’re still worth adding to your cart. The same can be said for the underappreciated beer staples that appear day-in and day-out on shelves. Beer essentials when I’m making a shopping trip to my local Binny’s include Firestone Walker 805 and Dovetail Helles. Seasonally, Sam Adams Oktoberfest rarely disappoints. *Whispers* Miller High Life is also an easy option beloved by beer fans, brewers and my wallet alike. 

The Hyped Up Item that Sells Out Instantly 

This is the doorbuster item that instantly sells out and leaves more people disappointed than jubilant due to the high demand and low probability that you’ll actually obtain the prized item you’re looking for. While 50% off TV deals and (potential) pre-orders to obtain next-generation video game consoles like the PS5 are sure to drive headlines and bring many fresh-faced shoppers into the fray, few will relish in the trophy of a discounted 50” TV. 

Similarly, the weekly IPA releases from the venerated likes of TreeHouse, Monkish and Alchemist draw high demand and instant bouts of FOMO, while rarely disappointing. Now that it’s barrel-aged beer season, the fight for online pre-orders for the likes of Revolution’s Deep Wood series releases will be fierce, and for good reason. After getting a taste of their first addition to this year’s Deep Wood series, Thundertaker, a sweet and boozy imperial rye Stout with some fun spice elements, I wouldn’t be surprised if subsequent pre-order scrambles create longer digital queues than your local Target at 11:59 p.m. on Black Friday. 

https://www.instagram.com/p/CFKOlroAuAC/

The Impulse (Seasonally-Inspired) Splurge 

Maybe you’re not buying a costume for a Halloween party this time around, but I’m sure the temptation for purchasing some half-off seasonal fall decor that will soon gather dust in a plastic bin in your garage will be tough. There’s always one item in your cart that you know you really have no business buying but the fun colors and 75% off tag makes the offer too enticing to pass up.

Craft beer has flourished on these types of purchasing decisions in the past few years, as beer lovers and traders flock to the latest, greatest, most-buzzed-about beers from their favorite local spots. One beer sure to generate an influx of ISO notes this month will be Phase Three Brewing Company’s new collaboration with Affy Apple, dubbed A Bushel of Apples. 

https://www.instagram.com/p/CGKpCACFYBs/

The beer aims to be a boozed-up version of a caramel apple, “Frankenstein” a traditional blonde Ale with apple juice, peanuts and Affy Apple caramel to create a new Fall-inspired offering that is sure to sell out. That said, hopefully this beer does sell out because $1 for every four-pack sold benefits the Greater Chicago Food Depository. 

The Truly Bizarre 

Every year, I read articles post-Prime Day on the truly bizarre items online shoppers unearthed in their never-ending quest for deals. Last year’s revelation was a 55-gallon drum of lubricant, on-sale for the low, low price of $1,361. Who knows what online dumpster divers will unearth this year, but I’m sure it’ll be eyebrow-raising. 

Similarly, pioneering craft breweries across the country have found a niche by exploring truly bold and bizarre ingredients to throw into their beers. These types of beers might not be for everyone, but they sure do garner headlines and buzz. A perfect example comes from Martin House Brewing Company in Fort Worth, Texas. The brewery decided to make some waves a few months back by adding a beloved snack food to a sour ale: Flamin’ Hot Cheetos. The result is Fiery Crunchy Cheesie Bois, a sour ale that Martin House describes as a “liquid Flamin Hot Cheeto.” Beers like this might not be for everyone; but hey, points for creativity? 

https://www.instagram.com/p/CDjQMj9FbkQ/?igshid=bily897ufled

The Sensible Option 

At the end of the day, a business behemoth like Amazon doesn’t really need the extra support generated by a big sales event like Prime Day. While I will give them credit for this year’s Prime Day promotion of small businesses, the most frugal and level-headed way to spend your money during days like Prime Day is to visit your local stores and websites instead. They need your money now more than ever, especially as the pandemic continues on. 

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The same goes for the breweries in your local area. Those that have thankfully survived the initial onslaught caused by the pandemic are still fighting to keep their doors open and they still need your support. Whether that’s buying beer online for delivery, visiting a socially-distanced taproom or purchasing a six-pack of their stuff at your local store, it always feels better to shop — and drink — local. Cheers! 

*Feature image courtesy of Amazon


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